CALENDAR
  • Events Calendar

    February  2017
    Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
       
      1 2 3 4
    5 6 7 8 9 10 11
    12 13 14 15 16 17 18
    19 20 21 22 23 24 25
    26 27 28  
    • Feb
      15

      Principal’s Message February 15, 2017

      Arise, for this is your task, and we are with you; be strong and do it.—Ezra 10:4

      Three-Way Conferences (or also known as Student-Led Conferences) are taking place this Friday. It is a time for the student, parents and teachers to meet and celebrate the learning that has been done thus far in the school year and to identify areas where goals can be set to continuously grow academically, socially, spiritually and physically.

      Normally, during a parent-teacher conference the teacher would be explaining to parents the progress of the child, but three-way conferences are student-driven and is an opportunity for the child to share about their learning experiences from their perspective, and understanding of themselves after reflection. It is a time for parents to encourage and recognise the child’s efforts and to set goals together so the child knows what to work on in the coming term, parents know how to support at home and teachers can also support at school.

      Some students are anxious during parent-teacher conferences because they are not in the classroom during the meeting, but for three-way conferences, it can be a different kind of nervousness. Children could be cautious and worried that they may be reprimanded by their parents and teacher at the same time. Please have a talk with your child before Friday about coming to the conference. Let them know that you look forward to hearing about them talk about their learning so you can en-courage and support them in their learning journey and development. The focus is on moving for-ward together.

      Jan
      24

      Applications Due for 2017-2018

      We will soon be reaching the 23 February deadline for accepting applications for Years 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the 2017-2018 school year..
       
      If you wish to apply, please first attend a school tour and then submit a completed application package by 3pm on the 23rd of February. You may book a school tour here and download the application form from this page.
       
      If you have any further questions or concerns regarding admissions, please contact our admissions officer at 2658 0341.  We are happy to assist you in this process.
      Jan
      11

      Principal’s Message January 11, 2017

      For I know the plans I have for you, “declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” —Jeremiah 29:11

      The new year is always a time for a fresh start. We hear people talking about setting new years resolutions but after a few months, it may not always be easy (or possible) to stick to the plan even if their heart tells them it’s the best thing they can do for themselves this year. For children, writing resolutions teaches children to be reflective, how to set achievable goals, decide what steps they will take to reach those goals, and stick to what they say they will do. It is a wonderful way to start out the year with their family when they sit together and think about what they would like to change or do better in the new year. But again, it is likely even harder for children to keep up with their resolutions. However, there are steps that parents can take to encourage and support their child as they reflect and set goals for themselves.

      Parents Magazine suggests eight ways to help children make new years resolutions. The following is a summary of their original article in their online site: http://www.parents.com/holiday/new-years/resolution/8-ways-to-help-kids-make-new-years-resolutions/

      1. Be Resolution Role Models—Parents can share their own resolutions with their children so they can see how their parents would approach the task. Some of the children’s resolutions can actually be modelled by the parents themselves. Dr. Carter says, “If what you want is for your kids to be out the door earlier, you need to work on yourself. I saw that when I was consistently ready at the time I wanted to leave; it was possible to ask my kids to make changes. Let’s not ask them to do more than we are willing to do.”

      2. Keep a Positive Approach to Resolutions—When you sit down with your chil-dren, begin by going over the positive things that they accomplished in the past year rather than pointing out their shortcomings. Have children brain-storm things that they are able to do now that they were not able to do last year. Help them to reflect what they did to make that possible. Afterwards, ask them what they want to improve for this coming year.

      3. Suggest-Don’t Dictate Resolutions—Children need to feel responsibility and ownership for their choices. Listen to what your children tell you and help them to make sure it is age appropriate and achievable. You may come up with cate-gories for them such as—personal goals (NIS has eight—enquiry, morality, resilience, communication, adaptability, respect, thoughtfulness, cooperation), friendship goals, helping goals and school goals.

      3. Narrow Down the Resolution List—Two to three goals are reasonable. Break each of the goals into smaller steps to plan how it can be achieved. These resolutions need to be concrete, specific and manageable. “I will behave better” is too general. Help students to focus on which particular behavior they can work on. For younger children, they can draw a picture to express themselves.

      4. Take Turtle Steps Toward Big Resolutions—Dr. Carter says that turning good intentions into habits is an important skill to teach children. She suggests parents break down each resolution into small and slow steps to help children achieve their goal. Make it easy to do over a period of time. It can be weeks or even months. Check in with children weekly or periodically to acknowledge how they are doing and do not bribe them into doing the resolution.

      5. Follow Up but Don’t Nag About Resolutions—Avoid nagging children when they experience a lapse; rather affirm how hard it is and ask them to reflect what is making it difficult for them to achieve their goal. If the plan in achieving the goal is not working, parents can always adjust with the children.

      6. Make Family Resolutions Together—This brings families closer. Suggest to children that they set two personal goals and one or two family goals. This can be as simple as “visit grandma more often” or “plan a trip”.

      7. Make Resolutions a Ritual—Make sure there are no distractions when you gather to talk about how the resolutions are going and pay attention to each other. Set a tradition of praying together first or having hot chocolate together every time you talk about it. Appealing to the senses and helping create a warm environment is important.

    • Feb
      15

      Principal’s Message February 15, 2017

      Arise, for this is your task, and we are with you; be strong and do it.—Ezra 10:4

      Three-Way Conferences (or also known as Student-Led Conferences) are taking place this Friday. It is a time for the student, parents and teachers to meet and celebrate the learning that has been done thus far in the school year and to identify areas where goals can be set to continuously grow academically, socially, spiritually and physically.

      Normally, during a parent-teacher conference the teacher would be explaining to parents the progress of the child, but three-way conferences are student-driven and is an opportunity for the child to share about their learning experiences from their perspective, and understanding of themselves after reflection. It is a time for parents to encourage and recognise the child’s efforts and to set goals together so the child knows what to work on in the coming term, parents know how to support at home and teachers can also support at school.

      Some students are anxious during parent-teacher conferences because they are not in the classroom during the meeting, but for three-way conferences, it can be a different kind of nervousness. Children could be cautious and worried that they may be reprimanded by their parents and teacher at the same time. Please have a talk with your child before Friday about coming to the conference. Let them know that you look forward to hearing about them talk about their learning so you can en-courage and support them in their learning journey and development. The focus is on moving for-ward together.

      Jan
      24

      Applications Due for 2017-2018

      We will soon be reaching the 23 February deadline for accepting applications for Years 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the 2017-2018 school year..
       
      If you wish to apply, please first attend a school tour and then submit a completed application package by 3pm on the 23rd of February. You may book a school tour here and download the application form from this page.
       
      If you have any further questions or concerns regarding admissions, please contact our admissions officer at 2658 0341.  We are happy to assist you in this process.
      Jan
      11

      Principal’s Message January 11, 2017

      For I know the plans I have for you, “declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” —Jeremiah 29:11

      The new year is always a time for a fresh start. We hear people talking about setting new years resolutions but after a few months, it may not always be easy (or possible) to stick to the plan even if their heart tells them it’s the best thing they can do for themselves this year. For children, writing resolutions teaches children to be reflective, how to set achievable goals, decide what steps they will take to reach those goals, and stick to what they say they will do. It is a wonderful way to start out the year with their family when they sit together and think about what they would like to change or do better in the new year. But again, it is likely even harder for children to keep up with their resolutions. However, there are steps that parents can take to encourage and support their child as they reflect and set goals for themselves.

      Parents Magazine suggests eight ways to help children make new years resolutions. The following is a summary of their original article in their online site: http://www.parents.com/holiday/new-years/resolution/8-ways-to-help-kids-make-new-years-resolutions/

      1. Be Resolution Role Models—Parents can share their own resolutions with their children so they can see how their parents would approach the task. Some of the children’s resolutions can actually be modelled by the parents themselves. Dr. Carter says, “If what you want is for your kids to be out the door earlier, you need to work on yourself. I saw that when I was consistently ready at the time I wanted to leave; it was possible to ask my kids to make changes. Let’s not ask them to do more than we are willing to do.”

      2. Keep a Positive Approach to Resolutions—When you sit down with your chil-dren, begin by going over the positive things that they accomplished in the past year rather than pointing out their shortcomings. Have children brain-storm things that they are able to do now that they were not able to do last year. Help them to reflect what they did to make that possible. Afterwards, ask them what they want to improve for this coming year.

      3. Suggest-Don’t Dictate Resolutions—Children need to feel responsibility and ownership for their choices. Listen to what your children tell you and help them to make sure it is age appropriate and achievable. You may come up with cate-gories for them such as—personal goals (NIS has eight—enquiry, morality, resilience, communication, adaptability, respect, thoughtfulness, cooperation), friendship goals, helping goals and school goals.

      3. Narrow Down the Resolution List—Two to three goals are reasonable. Break each of the goals into smaller steps to plan how it can be achieved. These resolutions need to be concrete, specific and manageable. “I will behave better” is too general. Help students to focus on which particular behavior they can work on. For younger children, they can draw a picture to express themselves.

      4. Take Turtle Steps Toward Big Resolutions—Dr. Carter says that turning good intentions into habits is an important skill to teach children. She suggests parents break down each resolution into small and slow steps to help children achieve their goal. Make it easy to do over a period of time. It can be weeks or even months. Check in with children weekly or periodically to acknowledge how they are doing and do not bribe them into doing the resolution.

      5. Follow Up but Don’t Nag About Resolutions—Avoid nagging children when they experience a lapse; rather affirm how hard it is and ask them to reflect what is making it difficult for them to achieve their goal. If the plan in achieving the goal is not working, parents can always adjust with the children.

      6. Make Family Resolutions Together—This brings families closer. Suggest to children that they set two personal goals and one or two family goals. This can be as simple as “visit grandma more often” or “plan a trip”.

      7. Make Resolutions a Ritual—Make sure there are no distractions when you gather to talk about how the resolutions are going and pay attention to each other. Set a tradition of praying together first or having hot chocolate together every time you talk about it. Appealing to the senses and helping create a warm environment is important.