CALENDAR
  • Events Calendar

    June  2017
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    • May
      25

      Principal’s Message May 24, 2017

      Dear friend, I pray that you may enjoy good health and that all may go well with you, even as your soul is getting along well.—3 John 1:2

      NIS welcomed Canadian holistic nutritionist, Cristina Tahoces, to speak with our parent community last Wednesday. During the talk, Cristina shared her main strategic approach to a healthy diet which she has named “Sleep-Love-Poop”. There are important foods that can help our children and us sleep better which is needed for cellular regeneration and those foods that sabotage our efforts. The right foods are needed to help with boosting immunity and giving us energy. In addition when planning our meals, we need to reflect if what we have selected is an “I love me” food. This means we are selecting food that helps with regulating our blood sugar which can lead to better memory and ability to handle stress. Finally, we need to ask if the foods we are eating are going to help us poop. Waste elimination is crucial to immunity and our overall happiness. We all know what it feels like to be bloated and it is not pleasant.

      The following is a summary of her talk and her suggestions for meal planning which can help to achieve her healthy “Sleep-Love-Poop” philosophy:

      My philosophy is that you don’t need to give up all of life’s guilty pleasures in the journey to eating a more nutrient-rich diet. You just have to trade empty calories from nutrient dense ones. Using this “trade up” ap-proach consistently will mean that your family’s diet will increase in:

      Higher quality protein to make sure your kids and you have the energy needed for growth, regeneration, brain power and stress management;

      Antioxidants to boost immunity and ward off the negative impact of our polluted environment;

      Essential Fatty Acids to help lower inflammation in the body and boost brain power;

      Slow-release carbohydrates to regulate blood sugar and ensure a steady energy level throughout the day and a constant release of food for the brain;

      Fibre to ensure beautiful, regular poops that are key to keeping happy and healthy.
      Increasing the nutrient content of your food will arm your family with what it needs to build immunity and reach the goal of “Zero Sick Days”.

      My remedies have been tried and tested by my family & clients. After I had kids, I was so weak and depleted. I developed severe allergies and constantly had sinus issues. These remedies were life savers for me and I have used them to nip a fair few sore throats and runny noses in the bud over the years. There is always a role for prescription medicine – don’t get me wrong! But sometimes, having the knowledge and confidence to use safe, affordable, natural remedies is all we need.

      The following are three links suggested by Cristina to help you choose a good probiotic, and to encourage your child to eat what you want them to eat:

      https://www.thrivenutritionpractice.com/blog/2016/06/18/part-1-how-to-choose-a-probiotic-my-trusted-brands?rq=probiotic

      https://www.thrivenutritionpractice.com/blog/2017/4/23/fewzfn7vx3re4v60tyl870kelh6o8c

      https://www.thrivenutritionpractice.com/blog/2016/08/23/using-mindfulness-to-stop-emotional-eating-overcoming-resistance-to-new-foods

      After the parent talk, Cristina left behind her survival guide to staying healthy and energized. Parents can visit the office and ask for a copy to explore some of the nutritional recipes she suggests that would provide a well-balanced diet.

      Cristina Tahoces contact: THRIVE Nutrition Practice www.thrivenutritionpractice.com Facebook: Thrive Nutrition Practice Phone: 6332 1181 Email: [email protected]

      May
      11

      Principal’s Message May 10, 2017

      She is clothed with strength and dignity; she can laugh at the days to come. She speaks with wisdom and faithful instruction on her tongue.—Proverbs 31:25-26

      It is with great joy that I announce the birth of Ma Laoshi’s son, Leo, last week. He came into the world just in time for Mother’s Day! As she shared about her sleepless nights, it made me think of all the amazing mothers I see at NIS and my own mother who experienced all that with their first-born, and perhaps with their second or third-born too.

      Having never been a mother myself, I cannot even begin to comprehend the selflessness, love, sacrifice and commitment of what it means to be a mother. We have all seen it on TV, in movies, read articles about it online about the hectic lives of mothers, but I wanted to hear first hand accounts of what motherhood is like and started asking my friends and staff members what it is like to be pregnant, give birth and have a little person fully dependent on you. What are those first couple of years like for new mothers?

      Not surprising, they always begin by describing the busyness of their life, and everything they had to give up. They shared how they love to travel and used to do that very easily with their other half, but it is no longer the case now. One of my friends prayed desperately the first time she traveled with her daughter that she would not cry and disturb the other passengers. It sounded very stressful for a flight that was over ten hours. Some told me about worries they had and how they have their child’s next ten years mapped out.

      After hearing all that, I would ask them if there is anything good about being a mother. That’s when all the beautiful “mom moments” came. They told me that feeling of fulfilment is indescribable. When you see how cute they are, when they hold their arms up to you wanting a hug or to be carried, and you know their whole world is you, nothing else matters. Every milestone is special and kept in mom’s heart. One mother told me that she was very happy enjoying life with her hus-band—just the two of them, but it was after having a child that her family felt complete. It teaches patience (and tests patience!) and all their experiences as a mother has helped them to become a better per-son.

      This Mother’s Day, I want to recognise all the wonderful mothers out there who work tirelessly and endlessly taking care of the family and the children. Thank you for everything that you do. God bless you and your family, and have a great and memorable Mother’s Day this year.

      Apr
      26

      Principal’s Message April 26, 2017

      When you lie down, you will not be afraid; when you lie down, your sleep will be sweet.—Psalm 3:24

      As adults we are so busy with work and family—with errands to run, people to see, meals to prepare, plus a myriad of other responsibilities. Sleep sometimes becomes secondary as project deadlines and other time sensitive things require our attention. However, sleep is as important as food and safety. It has a huge influence on health especially in the develop-ment of children. When it comes to sleep, amount and quality is the key. Sadly, Hong Kong children often have less than the optimal amount. It is surprising to see just how many hours of sleep children need.

      How does your child measure up? Stop and calculate the number of hours your child has on an average night. Ready for the numbers?
      3-5 years old—11-13 hours 6-13 years old—9-11 hours

      That is a lot of hours but it is crucial in their development. Even as adults when we do not have enough sleep we be-come more irritable, less focused and slower in responding. How much more so for a child.

      From the Harvard Medical School, studies have shown that the amount and quality of sleep have an effect on learning and memory. Learning and memory have three functions: acquisition, consolidation and recall. Acquisition happens when new knowledge is being learnt. A tired child will not be able to focus their attention which makes it harder to take in new knowledge. Secondly, the consolidation of memory happens during sleep and this is vital in helping children learn new information. The strengthening of neurons that form memory happens during sleep. So if a child is not sleeping well, that consolidation after a full day of learning at school is not happening.

      Decision-making is also affected. I am sure every parent has gone through days when their child did not have enough sleep the night before and was extra difficult—ranging from being more slow and sluggish to throwing tantrums or crying as they wrestle with what is happening to their brain and body from the lack of sleep. Adults will know when they are tired and can regulate themselves, but a young child will not know and so will let their emotions get the better of them. Sound judgement would be impaired.

      Quality of sleep is just as important as the amount of sleep. Quality sleep is uninterrupted sleep that allows the child to move through the stages of sleep. To ensure that children are getting enough quality sleep, ex-perts agree that TVs, laptops and other technological devices need to be switched off at least an hour before bedtime. There should be a regular and consistent bedtime routine, and the room should be dark, cool and quiet. Finally, avoid caffeine at night because it takes hours to leave the system. This includes drinks like coke, and box drinks such as lemon tea.

      Putting your child to bed early has huge benefits for them, but it is also good for parents! You can have some quiet time for yourself or with your husband/wife. Or perhaps you can sleep early yourself because adults should have 7-9 hours. Whatever it may be, sleep is vital and if your child is not hitting those minimum number hours of sleep, I encourage you to try it out with your family for two weeks and I am sure that you will notice a difference.

    • May
      25

      Principal’s Message May 24, 2017

      Dear friend, I pray that you may enjoy good health and that all may go well with you, even as your soul is getting along well.—3 John 1:2

      NIS welcomed Canadian holistic nutritionist, Cristina Tahoces, to speak with our parent community last Wednesday. During the talk, Cristina shared her main strategic approach to a healthy diet which she has named “Sleep-Love-Poop”. There are important foods that can help our children and us sleep better which is needed for cellular regeneration and those foods that sabotage our efforts. The right foods are needed to help with boosting immunity and giving us energy. In addition when planning our meals, we need to reflect if what we have selected is an “I love me” food. This means we are selecting food that helps with regulating our blood sugar which can lead to better memory and ability to handle stress. Finally, we need to ask if the foods we are eating are going to help us poop. Waste elimination is crucial to immunity and our overall happiness. We all know what it feels like to be bloated and it is not pleasant.

      The following is a summary of her talk and her suggestions for meal planning which can help to achieve her healthy “Sleep-Love-Poop” philosophy:

      My philosophy is that you don’t need to give up all of life’s guilty pleasures in the journey to eating a more nutrient-rich diet. You just have to trade empty calories from nutrient dense ones. Using this “trade up” ap-proach consistently will mean that your family’s diet will increase in:

      Higher quality protein to make sure your kids and you have the energy needed for growth, regeneration, brain power and stress management;

      Antioxidants to boost immunity and ward off the negative impact of our polluted environment;

      Essential Fatty Acids to help lower inflammation in the body and boost brain power;

      Slow-release carbohydrates to regulate blood sugar and ensure a steady energy level throughout the day and a constant release of food for the brain;

      Fibre to ensure beautiful, regular poops that are key to keeping happy and healthy.
      Increasing the nutrient content of your food will arm your family with what it needs to build immunity and reach the goal of “Zero Sick Days”.

      My remedies have been tried and tested by my family & clients. After I had kids, I was so weak and depleted. I developed severe allergies and constantly had sinus issues. These remedies were life savers for me and I have used them to nip a fair few sore throats and runny noses in the bud over the years. There is always a role for prescription medicine – don’t get me wrong! But sometimes, having the knowledge and confidence to use safe, affordable, natural remedies is all we need.

      The following are three links suggested by Cristina to help you choose a good probiotic, and to encourage your child to eat what you want them to eat:

      https://www.thrivenutritionpractice.com/blog/2016/06/18/part-1-how-to-choose-a-probiotic-my-trusted-brands?rq=probiotic

      https://www.thrivenutritionpractice.com/blog/2017/4/23/fewzfn7vx3re4v60tyl870kelh6o8c

      https://www.thrivenutritionpractice.com/blog/2016/08/23/using-mindfulness-to-stop-emotional-eating-overcoming-resistance-to-new-foods

      After the parent talk, Cristina left behind her survival guide to staying healthy and energized. Parents can visit the office and ask for a copy to explore some of the nutritional recipes she suggests that would provide a well-balanced diet.

      Cristina Tahoces contact: THRIVE Nutrition Practice www.thrivenutritionpractice.com Facebook: Thrive Nutrition Practice Phone: 6332 1181 Email: [email protected]

      May
      11

      Principal’s Message May 10, 2017

      She is clothed with strength and dignity; she can laugh at the days to come. She speaks with wisdom and faithful instruction on her tongue.—Proverbs 31:25-26

      It is with great joy that I announce the birth of Ma Laoshi’s son, Leo, last week. He came into the world just in time for Mother’s Day! As she shared about her sleepless nights, it made me think of all the amazing mothers I see at NIS and my own mother who experienced all that with their first-born, and perhaps with their second or third-born too.

      Having never been a mother myself, I cannot even begin to comprehend the selflessness, love, sacrifice and commitment of what it means to be a mother. We have all seen it on TV, in movies, read articles about it online about the hectic lives of mothers, but I wanted to hear first hand accounts of what motherhood is like and started asking my friends and staff members what it is like to be pregnant, give birth and have a little person fully dependent on you. What are those first couple of years like for new mothers?

      Not surprising, they always begin by describing the busyness of their life, and everything they had to give up. They shared how they love to travel and used to do that very easily with their other half, but it is no longer the case now. One of my friends prayed desperately the first time she traveled with her daughter that she would not cry and disturb the other passengers. It sounded very stressful for a flight that was over ten hours. Some told me about worries they had and how they have their child’s next ten years mapped out.

      After hearing all that, I would ask them if there is anything good about being a mother. That’s when all the beautiful “mom moments” came. They told me that feeling of fulfilment is indescribable. When you see how cute they are, when they hold their arms up to you wanting a hug or to be carried, and you know their whole world is you, nothing else matters. Every milestone is special and kept in mom’s heart. One mother told me that she was very happy enjoying life with her hus-band—just the two of them, but it was after having a child that her family felt complete. It teaches patience (and tests patience!) and all their experiences as a mother has helped them to become a better per-son.

      This Mother’s Day, I want to recognise all the wonderful mothers out there who work tirelessly and endlessly taking care of the family and the children. Thank you for everything that you do. God bless you and your family, and have a great and memorable Mother’s Day this year.

      Apr
      26

      Principal’s Message April 26, 2017

      When you lie down, you will not be afraid; when you lie down, your sleep will be sweet.—Psalm 3:24

      As adults we are so busy with work and family—with errands to run, people to see, meals to prepare, plus a myriad of other responsibilities. Sleep sometimes becomes secondary as project deadlines and other time sensitive things require our attention. However, sleep is as important as food and safety. It has a huge influence on health especially in the develop-ment of children. When it comes to sleep, amount and quality is the key. Sadly, Hong Kong children often have less than the optimal amount. It is surprising to see just how many hours of sleep children need.

      How does your child measure up? Stop and calculate the number of hours your child has on an average night. Ready for the numbers?
      3-5 years old—11-13 hours 6-13 years old—9-11 hours

      That is a lot of hours but it is crucial in their development. Even as adults when we do not have enough sleep we be-come more irritable, less focused and slower in responding. How much more so for a child.

      From the Harvard Medical School, studies have shown that the amount and quality of sleep have an effect on learning and memory. Learning and memory have three functions: acquisition, consolidation and recall. Acquisition happens when new knowledge is being learnt. A tired child will not be able to focus their attention which makes it harder to take in new knowledge. Secondly, the consolidation of memory happens during sleep and this is vital in helping children learn new information. The strengthening of neurons that form memory happens during sleep. So if a child is not sleeping well, that consolidation after a full day of learning at school is not happening.

      Decision-making is also affected. I am sure every parent has gone through days when their child did not have enough sleep the night before and was extra difficult—ranging from being more slow and sluggish to throwing tantrums or crying as they wrestle with what is happening to their brain and body from the lack of sleep. Adults will know when they are tired and can regulate themselves, but a young child will not know and so will let their emotions get the better of them. Sound judgement would be impaired.

      Quality of sleep is just as important as the amount of sleep. Quality sleep is uninterrupted sleep that allows the child to move through the stages of sleep. To ensure that children are getting enough quality sleep, ex-perts agree that TVs, laptops and other technological devices need to be switched off at least an hour before bedtime. There should be a regular and consistent bedtime routine, and the room should be dark, cool and quiet. Finally, avoid caffeine at night because it takes hours to leave the system. This includes drinks like coke, and box drinks such as lemon tea.

      Putting your child to bed early has huge benefits for them, but it is also good for parents! You can have some quiet time for yourself or with your husband/wife. Or perhaps you can sleep early yourself because adults should have 7-9 hours. Whatever it may be, sleep is vital and if your child is not hitting those minimum number hours of sleep, I encourage you to try it out with your family for two weeks and I am sure that you will notice a difference.